TempSafaricom has rolled out the second edition of Business Journalism fellowship, an eight month, mid-career program that gives business journalists the opportunity to train alongside Kenya’s leading business lecturers and some of the top corporate newsmakers in the region.

As a result of an irresistible wave of social media influence, the mainstream media has lost control of its audiences which is why the program has been designed to train and mentor them on better understanding of the business environment not only to train them on how to cover news but most importantly to enable them do an in depth of the news.

The highly competitive course will admit 15 of the most promising applicants. The successful applicants will be taken through three modules, with each module requiring four days of intensive training with some of the most respected minds in the business world.

The experiential learning and mentoring programme will also include half-day workshops spread over eight months as well as exclusive guest speaker dinner events where the journalists will enjoy opportunities to learn from and network with mentors and business leaders.

The fellowship programme that focuses on financial reporting will this year cover topics including: economic analysis, business strategy and financial analysis, big data and cyber security. The 1st edition of the Business journalism Fellowship programme saw 12 fellows graduate and are currently top business reporters in various media houses.

“It’s time for business journalists to challenge the notion that Kenyan audiences are more interested in politics than they are in the development of the economy and how it affects them. The just ended Global Entrepreneurship Summit is proof that audiences are interested in business news, but to do this successfully journalists must be armed with an understanding of the business environment and how to cover business news.” Said Safaricom CEO Bob Collymore who was at the launch.

During the eight month duration of the programme the journalists will be expected to finish a 30-hour credit course before they can graduate.

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